Are Post-Interview “Thank You” Notes Necessary?

You had a great interview, you loved the program, and now you want to follow up. But is sending a “Thank You” note after a residency interview necessary or allowed? Does sending a thank-you note impact where the program will rank you?
Although the Match rules somewhat limit the nature of communications between applicants and programs, applicants are indeed allowed to send thank-you notes to programs. Some programs will even send thank-you notes to applicants after interviewing. 
As for whether thank-you notes impact rank order, the answer is: probably not. Interviewers often form opinions of interviewees during the interview and score or note down their thoughts right after. Many programs sit together and decide rankings soon after they interview, so your note may not arrive in time.
Despite this, however, thank-you notes are still popular among applicants simply because it is one more thing that applicants can do in a process that is mostly out of their control. In addition, it is a way to express genuine appreciation for an organized interview day and interest in the program. 
If you do choose to write a note, you can do either a physical mailed note or an email. Physical notes take much more time and effort, but they add a nice touch that emails don’t have. The choice is up to you. If you do choose to write thank you notes, generally writing to just the program director/program coordinator is sufficient, unless you particularly connected with an interviewer that you would also like to reach out to.
Either way, don’t worry if you don’t receive a reply. Most interviewers will not reply because anything complimentary could be taken the wrong way by an applicant (i.e. mistaking “you are a great candidate” for guarantee of a match).

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